Press release from Volkswagen regarding the CO2 issue.

VW Logo with Das Emissions written under

CO2 issue largely concluded

No unlawful change to the stated fuel consumption and CO2 figures found to date
Only a small number of the model variants of new cars will have the catalogue figure slightly adjusted

Wolfsburg, 9 December 2015 – Just a month after questions relating to the CO2 figures measured on some of the Group’s models arose, Volkswagen has largely concluded the clarification of the matter. Following extensive internal investigations and measurement checks, it is now clear that almost all of these model variants do correspond to the CO2 figures originally determined. This means that these vehicles can be marketed and sold without any limitations. The suspicion that the fuel consumption figures of current production vehicles had been unlawfully changed was not confirmed. During internal re-measurements slight deviations were found on just nine model variants of the Volkswagen brand.

These model variants will be re-measured by a neutral technical service under the supervision of the appropriate authority by Christmas. In cases where the correctness of original figures is confirmed, there will be no consequences. These cars can be offered for sale by dealers without any reservations. In the case of any deviations, the figures will be adjusted in the future in the course of the normal processes as required.

Volkswagen presented these results to the investigation commission of the Federal Government and the Federal Motor Transport Authority (KBA). The figure of approximately 800,000 vehicles under suspicion originally published by the Volkswagen Group has not been confirmed. The deviations found in the figures for only nine model variants amount to a few grams of CO2 on average, corresponding to increased cycle consumption in the NEDC of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 litres per 100 kilometres. With an annual production of approximately 36,000 vehicles, these model variants correspond to around only 0.5 per cent of the volume of the Volkswagen brand. The list of the nine model variants can be found at www.volkswagen- media-services.com.

The Group’s subsidiaries Audi, SKODA and SEAT have also agreed a similar procedure with the approval authorities responsible for the vehicles initially considered.

Customers’ real-world consumption figures do not change and neither are any technical vehicle modifications necessary. Against this background, the negative impact on earnings of
€2 billion that was originally expected has not been confirmed.

Whether we will have a minor economic impact, depends on the results of the re-measurement exercise.

VW Logo with Das Emissions written below

VW Emissiongate

Picture Blog from VolksPower 2012

I have decided to just do a picture blog for this show, partly because I am so busy cleaning mud of everything and doing my usual day job (running Classic Volks & York Classic VWs) and getting ready for setting of to CamperJam 2012 on Friday.  Seems the working weeks are very short currently as I am at shows pretty much every weekend, so I spend Mondays cleaning all camping equipment (all shows so far have been wet and muddy), and then Fridays are spent packing up and getting ready to go, with a day in the middle somewhere to give Miss Betsy (my 1969 Beetle a bit of love ready for her next trip).  We took plenty of pictures so please enjoy.

Dubfreeze 2012 Show Report

Some may say we’re totally crazy, others know and understand our obsession. Yes, it was the middle of February and extremely cold but that was not going to stop us heading down for a night of camping in order to be on site ready for the first Veedub show of the year.

We Met a couple of club members in York and set off just after 12:30 – all very excited and very much looking forward to this – marking the start of the 2012 VW events season. Our first stop was Woodall services just over an hours drive from York, here we met up with some of the Sheffield Owners club and some of the Doncaster club as well as some of the RULE (R U Low Enough) Club. From there we convoyed the rest of the way down to Staffordshire Showground.

We arrived at the Showground at around 4pm and found our York Classic VWs Club camping area – a couple of our members had arrived before us as they had been in the area the night before. We set up our tent in the freezing cold – although I have to say putting the tent up and the excitement must have kept us warm as we didn’t notice how cold it was after a while. Once the tent was up it was time for a coffee in the tent with the heater on. We then all had a bar-b-que and sat around and chatted dubs for a few hours, then decided it was getting a little cold so thought we should head of to the bar where it may be a little warmer. The walk over to the bar, although only a few minutes, was absolutely freezing so the warmth on arriveing was very welcome. We stayed in the bar and chatted to fellow Veedubbers for a few hours. We then headed back to the cold, cold tent. Heater on and coffee made it was time to try and get some sleep. We managed to stay warm enough to get some sleep which was great – with the help of a heater and a great big duvet! The next morning we were all up nice and early – part of this due to the cold and partly because we were all very excited about the show. Coffee and bacon on the bar-b and then ready to head over to the show – thankfully this show is an indoor one. We had woken in the morning to snow on the ground (it did disappear pretty quickly though as the sun was shining).

The show The show didn’t open til 9am so until then we decided we should have a wonder round and look at some of the lovely VWs around, and there were some real beauties. At about 9:30 we decided that the queue would have gone down enough so to the show we went. First stop was up to Dogs N Dubs up on the balcony to take them a much needed bacon butty.

The show was absolutely jam packed – obviously a very popular show, I think the majority of people drove to Stafford on the day (not too many people around mad enough to camp in this cold weather!). It was very difficult at first to get anywhere – so busy. We had a good wander around the show and shine area – some absolutely gorgeous dubs in there, I would have found it very difficult to pick a winner. If you are looking to buy anything VW related whether parts of accessories or clothing this is definitely a show to visit. We saw some fantastic cars and vans for sale – if only we’d had some cash on us (actually, probably a good thing we didn’t as there may have been a good few veedubs heading back to York with us! There was an amazing number of parts for sale including panels etc. All in all a very good show – although I do think they maybe need a bigger venue.
To get a real idea of the show please visit our facebook page: and have a good look through the photo album for Dubfreeze 2012, I have only added a small sample of the photos on here.

History of VW…

Written by Kate McCarthy of York Classic VWs – Click here to visit York Classic VWs Website

The history of these fantastic vehicles fascinates me and so I thought I would share a little of what I know with anybody that is interested in where they came from and why.


The majority of people in Germany in the 1930’s couldn’t afford a car due to the cars of the time mainly comprising of luxury models.  There were not many who could afford anything more than a motorcycle, which wasn’t the greatest way to get around with a family.  









Adolf Hitler decided that what was needed was a state sponsored Volkswagen “Peoples Car” Program.  Hitler wanted a basic car that would be capable of carrying two adults and three children at a speed of 62mph (100km/h).  A savings scheme was set up for citizens of the Third Reich and the car was to be sold at 990RM (ReichsMark – 5RM was roughly 1GBP, average weekly income was about 32RM per week)  – this was about the same price as a small motorbike.  

There were existing projects of this kind (not state sponsored) that many people tried to persuade Hitler to go with.  Hitler decided he wanted and all new state owned factory for his project.  He then needed to find an engineer to design the “Peoples Car” and approached the already famed Ferdinand Porsche, who was happy to and agreed to create the Volks Wagen for Hitler.


The idea was that Germans would buy the car by means of a savings scheme and would have to put aside 5 RM (Marks) per week – Fünf Mark die Woche musst Du sparen, willst Du im eigenen Wagen fahren” – “Five Marks a week you must put aside, If in your own car you want to ride“.  Around 336,000 Germans paid into the scheme before war broke out.  After the war citizens of West Germany had there savings honoured but East Germans did not.

Prototypes of the car were appearing from 1936 onwards and the first was the Kdf-Wagen (“Kraft durch freude” – meaning “strength through joy”).  The idea was that these cars needed to be fuel efficient, reliable, user-friendly and economical for repairs and parts.  The prototype had the distinctive round shape that we all know and love, it was air cooled and had the rear mounted engine.

The new factory building was started on 26th May 1938 in the new town of Kdf-Stadt – now called Wolfsburg. A town which was purpose built for the factory workers.  When war broke out in 1939 there had only been a handful of cars built.  None of the holders of completed savings stamps books had their car delivered, but a Type 1 Cabriolet was presented to Hitler on 20th April 1938 as a present for his 49th birthday.

When war broke out, production at the factory had to be changed to military vehicles – the type 82, Kübelwagen being one of the vehicles produced there.  During the war slave labour was used at the factory – this was not totally admitted until 1998.  Many of the workers during the war (around 80%) were from slave labour and many coming from the concentration camps.  In 1998 Volkswagen decided to set up a voluntary restitution fund for the survivors.

The town of Kdf-Stadt (Wolfsburg) was badly bombed during the war including the factory which was then placed under the control of British Army Officer Major Ivan Hirst.  To start with use of the factory was going to be for military vehicle maintenance.  But Hirst painted one of the factory cars in green and showed it to the British Army HQ, as they were short of light transport, in September 1945 the British Army ordered 20,00.  The first few hundred cars went to occupying forces personnel and some to the German post office.  When British service personnel were demobilsed, some were allowed to bring their cars back to the UK.

The factory was still in disrepair but managed to be producing 1,000 cars a month by 1946.  Unfortunately as it was in such a bad state of repair rain stopped production and some of the cars had to be traded for steel that was required for production.  Post war both the car and the town had their names changed, the car became Volkswagen and the town became Wolfsburg.  It was unknown at this point what would become of the factory, many countries motor industries were offered the plant but all rejected it one even saying that the car was too ugly and too noisy for the average motor car buyer!  In 1945 the factory was to be dismantled and moved to Britain, fortunately for VW no British car manufacturer would touch it.  The car survived in Germany by producing cars for the British army. Protected by Major Ivan Hirst the factory survived and then became part of Germany’s economic recovery.

Major Hirst stayed until 1949 by which time it had been reformed as a trust and was controlled by the West German government.  Until his death in 1968 Heinrich Nordhoff ran the factory and stuck to a one model policy other than the Type 2 commercial van (van, pick up and camper) and the Karmann Ghia sports car.

VW started to sell in USA in 1949, but got off to a very slow start – only selling 2 in the first year.  This did increase dramatically with production reaching one million by 1955.

The car became more and more popular throughout Europe and USA beating the world record on 17th February 1972 when the 15,007,034th was sold.  By 1973 production had risen to over 16 million!

And so the story goes, there were many models made and many other vehicles designed and built from that first car, they have all been very popular but none ever as popular as the ever loved VW Beetle.

I will follow this up with model descriptions from 1938 onwards.